Who are the culprits for power outage?

When electricity was discovered it took out the darkness and spread the light everywhere. As the consumption increased, electricity was generated in central power stations. Post that we have been using electricity for many applications. Electricity became the lifeline of sectors like railways, agriculture, telecommunication, etc. It also helped to increase the wealth and GDP of the nation. Today many countries measure their wealth in terms of how much electricity they produce annually. Hence we cannot afford any disturbances in the production and distribution of electricity.

Electric appliances have made our lives easier. Now our day to day life depends on them. The use of wires and cables make it convenient to distribute electricity. But these wires and cables face many problems every day. One of the major problems is that they have a constant threat of damage caused by rodents.

Rodents have a ubiquitous presence and are a nuisance to us. Rodents like squirrels, rats are notorious. They have a pair of incisors which grow throughout their life. Hence to keep them in check they constantly chew on anything they find hard like our wires and cables. They not only damage our wires and cables but they also affect the equipment at the power station.

There have been many incidences where rodents were the culprits causing power outages. This incident happened in Muncie (US) on 3rd February 2016. A squirrel was responsible for a massive power outage leaving more than 4,000 customers without power. A similar incident happened in Tulsa (US) on 5th February 2016. A squirrel caused 40-minute power outage affecting 5,500 customers.

Because of these increasing incidences, people are keeping track of power outages caused by animals. There are also organizations which keep track of such occurrences. The website called cybersquirrel1 recorded a total of  671 power outages caused by squirrels, 255 by birds, 54 by raccoons, 28 by rats, etc. all around the world till the year 2015. The website only showed officially registered incidences, we cannot imagine the total number of undocumented incidences.

The industry is also afraid of these pesky rodents. They are afraid that these rodents can cause heavy monetary losses and can bring any business to stand still.

John C. Inglis, Former Deputy Director, National Security Agency, US, stated that “I don’t think paralysis [of the electrical grid] is more likely by cyber attack than by natural disaster. And frankly the number-one threat experienced to date by the US electrical grid is squirrels.”

According to the officials of Georgia Power (US), squirrels can cause up to $2 million dollars worth of damage yearly.

Officials at Galvin Electricity Initiative, (US) stated that “Our interconnected and highly visible electric power system is extremely vulnerable, and not just to terrorist attacks and natural disasters. Most power outages are caused by problems in the distribution system, and 85 percent of those are caused by squirrels.”

Looking at the above figures and statements there is need of an effective solution as conventional prevention and control methods like the use of pesticides and insecticides have not been effective. These pesticides and insecticides are not designed to sustain manufacturing processes of polymeric applications. They are toxic and hazardous in nature. They leach out of the polymeric applications. They pollute soil and ground water reservoir.

C Tech Corporation  can offer a solution to overcome these problems. RodrepelTM  is an anti-rodent, anti-animal, extremely low toxicity and extremely low hazard, environmentally safe solution. It does not kill target species but only repels them.

The product triggers a fear response in rodents thus protecting the application. It causes severe temporary distress to the mucous membrane of the rodents due to which the pest stays away from the application. The product triggers an unpleasant reaction in case if the pest tries to gnaw away the application. After encountering the above-mentioned emotions, the animal instinctively perceives it with something it should stay away from and stores this information for future reference. The fact that certain rodents are repelled is mimicked by other rodents as well. Thus, the other rodents too stay away from the applications. The unpleasant experience is imprinted within the animal’s memory and passed on to its progeny.

The masterbatch of RodrepelTM  can be incorporated in wires and cables, polymer pipes, etc. RodrepelTM  liquid concentrate can be added to paints and then be applied to the polymeric applications.  The product in the form of lacquer can be applied over polymeric application

RodrepelTM  is cost-effective, inert, thermally stable and does not degrade on exposure to heat and sunlight. It does not volatilize and does not degrade in the soil. It is RoHS, RoHS2, REACH, NEA, EU BPR, APVMA compliant and FIFRA exempted.

Contact us at technical.marketing@ctechcorporation.com if you’re facing problems with rodents and get best remedies to combat the pest menace.

Also, visit our websites:

http://www.ctechcorporation.com/
http://www.rodrepel.com/
http://www.termirepel.com/
http://www.combirepel.com/

Follow our Facebook pages at:

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Obnoxious Marmots!!!

Marmots are large rodents that often become a nuisance to gardeners, farmers, and homeowners due to their appetites and burrowing habits. The yellow-bellied marmot is the most common species in the United States and a close relative of the woodchuck. Also known as rockchucks or whistle pigs, yellow-bellied marmots are social creatures that live in communities of 10 to 20 individuals. During the spring and summer, the animals undergo a period of hyperphagia, a feeding frenzy designed to fatten the marmots so they can survive the coming winter. By huddling together in underground burrows lined with hay or grass, marmots hibernate for up to 200 days at a time, easily spending half of their 13 to 15 years of life asleep.

Yellow-bellied marmots grow about 2 feet long and weigh up to 12 pounds. They have coarse brown or tan fur with light yellow coloring on their bellies and large claws on their front feet used for digging extensive burrows underground. Their stout bodies are designed to hold thick layers of fat and their prominent front teeth allow them to chew the stalks, leaves, blossoms, and fruits of their favorite plants.

High elevations and rocky outcroppings used as lookout posts are favored habitats for marmots. They can also be found among pastures, meadows, and rocky steppes. The animals have been known to live among the foothills of mountainous regions, burrowing beneath slopes of tumbled-down rocks and boulders, as well. In urban areas, marmots can be seen sunning themselves or gnawing on the grass at the side of the road.

Marmots prefer food sources, such as clover, herbaceous greens, or garden vegetables. Farmers encounter problems when marmots enter fields where cereal grains, root vegetables, or herbs grow. Marmots are naturally shy of humans and will not enter homes. They prefer to scavenge where they have a clear view of danger.

Marmots can cause major damage to gardens and crops. When feeding, marmots tend to chew the entire plant down to the ground, leaving nothing. Ripe vegetables, herbs, and cereal grains are the most enticing temptations to hungry marmots, who will dig beneath most fences to get at desired plants.

Additionally, unchecked burrows may undermine the structural integrity of manmade dams, levees, or embankments.

Aside from the fact that they may be eating your plants, marmots are not all that dangerous, preferring to lounge around all day instead of chasing you. As long as you leave them alone, they’ll leave you alone. This means, however, that they may bite you if you try to feed them or you accidentally disturb them.

The most dangerous thing about marmots is that they can carry a bunch of nasty things like ticks that cause Lyme disease, or Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. It is also possible for them to transmit hantavirus or rabies. These diseases can cause serious medical problems that cause anything from minor aches and pains to severe damage of the nervous and respiratory systems.

Let us look at some shreds of evidence

Marmots plague Eastern Washington neighborhoods

June 24, 2009 │The Oregonian

The large rodents have become pests in the Eastern Washington town of Prosser. Diners at a restaurant in Prosser were startled Monday when a furry marmot wandered through the front door and settled into a corner.

That was no surprise to city Administrator Charlie Bush, who says the big rodents have long been a problem in the central Washington wine town.

In 2006 and 2007, the city paid $5,700 over two years to hire trappers to thin the population. But last year, the City Council ran short of money and decided to get out of the marmot-control business.

Three years ago, residents complained that the rodents were swarming a 75-unit development of manufactured homes near the Prosser airport, burrowing under homes and fouling front porches with their droppings. There were even unconfirmed accounts of marmots attacking people.

Marmots invade Matterhorn area

September 14, 2017

“So sweet!”, coo the tourists. “Shoot them,” say the authorities in Zermatt, where marmots have become a plague. The furry rodents are causing damage to meadows and houses. “If someone leaves a balcony door open, marmots sneak into the house. They also dig beneath retaining walls,” Romy Biner-Hauser, Zermatt’s mayor, told Swiss Public Radio, SRF. “

Farmers in Zermatt are particularly hard hit by the influx of marmots. Shepherd and organic farmer Paul Julen can no longer use one of his fields because of all the marmot holes.

“The risk of accidents is very high when there are so many marmot holes in a meadow,” he said, remarking that he almost lost two newborn lambs that had fallen into a marmot burrow.

The currents rodenticides and traps are being used to control this menace. Repeated exposure to rodenticides builds up resistance in rodents. The pesticides also contribute to air,water and soil pollution. Farmers,pesticide applicators and horticultural workers may contact with pesticides in their professional environment. Several millions of cases of pesticides poisoning are registered every year. Frequent rodenticide applications make the problem worse.

We have a Solution for you!!

C Tech Corporation  can offer a solution to this problem. Our product RodrepelTM is an extremely low toxicity and extremely low hazard and eco-friendly rodent aversive. This product acts through a series of highly developed intricate mechanisms ensuring that rodents are kept away from the target application. This innovative product is in masterbatch form, can be incorporated with the drip tapes, tubes, pipes, agricultural films, mulches. The product does not leach out, thus preventing soil pollution. Groundwater reserves are also not polluted. Also, the non-target beneficial species like earthworms, bees etc are not affected.

Our product in lacquer form can be coated over polymeric tree guards, fences, various PVC surfaces etc. which would ensure complete protection against these creatures. Our products provide a safe and environmentally friendly solution to avoid rodent infestation.

The product is compliant with ROHS, ROHS2, ISO, REACH, APVMA, NEA, EU-BPR, and FIFRA exempted.

Contact us at technical.marketing@ctechcorporation.com if you’re facing problems with rodents and get best remedies to combat the pest menace.

Also, visit our websites:

http://www.ctechcorporation.com/
http://www.rodrepel.com/
http://www.termirepel.com/
http://www.combirepel.com/

Follow our Facebook pages at:

1] https://www.facebook.com/Combirepel-411710912249274/
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Mice Menace in Agriculture

The agriculture sector is one of the important sectors all over the world as it provides us with the basic requirement which is food. But a menace to this sector is the loss created by rodents; namely rats, mice, and squirrels; which leads to huge productivity loss and crop contamination.

Rodents are a great threat to farmers as they destroy one percent of the world’s cereal crops on an annual basis. Rodents are the consumers of vitamin and protein-rich foods and often fed on crops embryo, stripping away germination capabilities and nutrients in the process. Rodents are notorious for contaminating food supplies, and one of the primary targets is grains.

Rodents cause harm in pre-harvest as well as the post-harvest stage of the agriculture farming. During pre-harvest time rodents attack sowed grains and decrease the productivity. The loss cannot be estimated. During the post-harvest time the rodents attack on fully developed crops and stored grains.

The drip irrigation technique applied as water conservation method has suffered loss due to rodents. The drip pipelines fall prey to the rodent attacks as they constantly chew on them as a part of their oral maintenance. As well as the water supply pipelines usually equipped with motors also fall prey to rodent attacks. The electric and water supply gets interrupted and cause delay, indirectly increasing the maintenance work of the farmer.

Mallee farmers reporting mice causing damage to canola crops

Gregor Heard 31 Aug 2017

MALLEE farmers in Victoria are anxiously monitoring flowering and budding canola crops for mice damage.

Growers are finding late winter crop damage most severe in canola as opposed to cereal crops, with mice tempted by soft, oil-rich canola buds.“There are crops that you could see going 1.5-2 tonnes to the hectare, but others where there are mice issues you can see going only 0.8t/ha or so, there is a big difference.”

“There is a wide variation in terms of the mouse load, farmers need to make sure they are getting out in the crop and walking around and checking whether they have numbers building up now.” In terms of identifying potential high mice loads, Ms. Browne said chew cards of canola soaked cardboard could be used to get an idea of the presence of mice, while growers also need to be on the look-out for chewed nodes, tillers or buds. Cropping farmers warned to look out for mice heading into warmer months.

KATE DOWLER AND ALICE POHLNER, The Weekly Times

August 29, 2017

FARMERS in the Wimmera, Mallee, and parts of the Western District are being urged to monitor and bait for mice in crops heading into spring after what was described earlier this year as some of the worst mice damage ever seen.

“In my area, mice are starting to run up canola plants that are flowering and lopping off seed pods, so that is a sure sign that we need to do something now,” Mr. Hastings said.

“We will need to bait in flowering lupins and canola.”

Mr. Hastings said the group, which takes information from CSIRO trapping, found mice were not currently doing a lot of damage to crops in Victoria.

“But we are concerned, coming into springtime, that they will become more active,” Mr. Hastings said. “The message to farmers is to continue monitoring.”

Like the above-mentioned cases, there are many cases of rodent attacks on farms causing severe damage to crops and its productivity. Entomologist said 4.6 to 54% paddy crops were lost due to rat infestation. Rodent attack damage as much as 55% of horticultural crops. The extent of stored grain losses depends upon the distribution, abundance, and species composition of the rodent population involved.

Mechanical, biological and chemical control methods are present but are not much effective against the regulation of rodent population density. The methods have some adverse effects on crops and indirectly to human beings. Hence there is a need for solution strongly effective rodent repellence.

C Tech Corporation  has developed RodrepelTM  ranges of an extremely low toxicity and extremely low hazard and eco-friendly, non-dangerous and environmentally safe anti-rodent additive that has been evaluated in various applications. It offers long-life action and has been bottom-up designed for various applications. RodrepelTM acts through a series of highly developed intricate mechanism that ensures rodents are kept away from the target application.

Our product RodrepelTM  makes use of the sensory mechanism of smell. Ferocious species are deterred from biting by advanced mechanisms like dermal irritation, extremely pungent taste and sensory stimuli modifications, thus conditioning there response towards the RodrepelTM containing Products.

Rodents, being social animals, communicate the unpleasant experience to their population in the vicinity. The product is environmentally friendly, meaning that it does not leach out of the polymer matrix, in addition to exercising the basic function of keeping the targets away.

The product is compliant with ROHS, ROHS2, ISO, REACH, APVMA, NEA, EU-BPR, and FIFRA exempted.

Contact us at technical.marketing@ctechcorporation.com if you’re facing problems with rodents and get best remedies to combat the pest menace.

Also, visit our websites:

http://www.ctechcorporation.com/
http://www.rodrepel.com/
http://www.termirepel.com/
http://www.combirepel.com/

Follow our Facebook pages at:

1] https://www.facebook.com/Combirepel-411710912249274/
2] https://www.facebook.com/Termirepel-104225413091251/
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Menace of the orange toothed!!

Swamp rats also known as orange-toothed species, coypu and nutria are the water-loving rodents that inhabit banks of rivers, lakes, lagoons, marshes, and swamps.

Swamp rats are about 1 meter in length measured from the end of its muzzle to the tip of its round scaly tail. It has short rounded ears and small eyes that are set high on the head to see clearly whilst swimming.

Swamp rats are native to South America but were introduced to the British lands. The Swamp rat’s fur is specially adapted to keep it warm and dry in winter. Long, coarse guard hairs conceal and protect the soft velvety underfur. This under fur is the reason for the Swamp rats breeding in British lands.

The Swamp rats are a constant reminder of the folly of introducing foreign species into a new country without fully considering the consequences. The consequences are as follows:

Swamp rats bite into new territory, but overall Louisiana wetland damage down

By Tristan Baurick, Posted on July 5, 2017 | The Times-Picayune

Nutria is on the move, eating up marshes in three Louisiana coastal parishes that had been largely untouched by the invasive rodent for almost a decade. That’s the bad news.

Since 2001, Nutrias have converted at least 42 square miles of land into open water, according to Wildlife and Fisheries.

The critters showed a renewed taste in the past year for Jefferson, St. Charles and Cameron parishes. These parishes had three of the six new damage sites noted in the 2017 Swamp rats survey. They hadn’t suffered any new damage since 2009.

Nutria regular favorite, Terrebonne Parish, suffered the lion’s share of the damage in 2017. Terrebonne had 82 percent of the total Swamp rats damage recorded in the latest survey. That’s down from last year’s estimate of 99 percent.

Across all coastal parishes, about 5,900 acres showed varying signs of Nutria damage.

Nigeria’s Ailing President Returns Home to an Office Full of Rats

PHILIP OBAJI JR., 08.24.17 12:00 AM ET

Muhammadu Buhari, a career military man, had promised to run the war against Boko Haram with an iron fist. But he’s clearly enfeebled, and the rodents are just one more problem.

CALABAR, Nigeria—Two days after President Muhammadu Buhari returned home—he had been away in London for 103 days receiving treatment for an undisclosed ailment—he managed to address the country. He looked frail and his speech was slurred in the broadcast early Monday morning, but he told his fellow citizens that he had been “kept in daily touch with events at home.”

“Following the three months’ period of disuse, rodents have caused a lot of damage to the furniture and the air conditioning units,” Buhari’s spokesman, Garba Shehu, told the local newspaper This Day as he explained why the president had not been to his office since his return.

It’s still not clear what variant of the rat was responsible for the damage, there are many in Nigeria: thicket rats, swamp rats, shaggy rats, and more. But the infestation hit an office that was renovated only two years ago.

As the fur demand decreased the Swamp rats is considered as the pests in many areas, destroying aquatic vegetation, marshes, and irrigation systems, and chewing through human-made items, such as tires and wooden house paneling, eroding river banks, and displacing native animals.

Swamp rats breed quickly and the breeding is continuous throughout the year. Besides breeding quickly the Swamp rats consume a large amount of vegetation. They feed yearly on plants including grasses, sedges, reeds, water parsnip, and even water lilies.

Swamp rats herbivory severely reduce overall wetland biomass and can lead to the conversion of wetland to open water. Swamp rats are typically more destructive in the winter than in the growing season, due largely to the scarcity of above-ground vegetation; as Swamp rats search for food, they dig up root networks and rhizomes for food.

On plots open to Swamp rats herbivory, 40% less vegetation was found that in plots guarded against Swamp rats by fences. Swamp rats fed more in the fertilized areas. Hence farmlands sprayed with fertilizers are more attracted by these Swamp Rats.

There are several methods used to control the Swamp rat infestation but are proving to be economically expensive and harmful to the environment. The rodenticide Zinc phosphide is used currently but is expensive and remains toxic for several months. The toxicity is reduced with the help of heavy rains but the toxic chemical enters into the water bodies.

Hence we need the best solution to combat against this orange-toothed pest.

CTech Corporation has the solution called as RodrepelTM which is extremely low toxicity and extremely low hazard, non-mutagenic, non-carcinogenic anti-rodent pest repellent.

The product RodrepelTM is developed by studying the natural repellency of plants against pests by using green chemistry and advanced technology.

RodrepelTM an eco-friendly rodent aversive works on the mechanism like fear, discomfort, aversion, training and association and conditioning.

RodrepelTM does not cause any harm to target as well as non-target species and hence helps to maintain the ecological balance.

RodrepelTM is available in three different forms viz. Masterbatch, Liquid Concentrate, and Lacquer. Masterbatch can be used while processing the polymeric applications such as wires, pipes, tires, agricultural equipment, etc. Liquid concentrate and Lacquer are the topical solutions that can be applied on the surfaces of fences, wooden house paneling, human-made items, etc.

Hence by using RodrepelTM one can have the best solution to combat against the destructive species- swamp rats.

Contact us at technical.marketing@ctechcorporation.com if you’re facing problems with rodents and get best remedies to combat the pest menace.

Also, visit our websites:

http://www.ctechcorporation.com/
http://www.rodrepel.com/
http://www.termirepel.com/
http://www.combirepel.com/

Follow our Facebook pages at:

1] https://www.facebook.com/Combirepel-411710912249274/
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Groundhogs – the annoying pests!!!

They feed on green vegetables. They dine on beautiful flowers. They burrow holes in the ground.

They are the most annoying and trouble causing pests.

“They” are the GROUNDHOGS!!!

Groundhogs are the largest squirrels of the genus Marmota. The species known by many names such as chuck, whistle pig, groundhog, marmot, monax and others – commonly known as the groundhogs are closely related to tree and ground squirrels, gophers, chipmunks, and prairie dogs.

However, groundhogs are a familiar species in agricultural landscapes within its range, occurring along roadsides, fencerows, pastures, the margins of fields, and even in some suburban habitats. They are normally found in burrows or holes that have been either made by them or by other animals which already left their dwellings.

Groundhogs are sometimes perceived to be pests as they wreak havoc.

How?? Let’s go through the following evidences.

Rock chuck wreaks havoc in Pocatello Parks and Rec building

By Journal Staff, Sep 15, 2017, XTREME IDAHO

POCATELLO — Pocatello Parks and Recreation officials aren’t entirely sure how a rock chuck got into its storage warehouse by Ross Park. But by the time the intruder was discovered, it had already caused hundreds of dollars in damages.

Officials said recently that the rock chuck had entered the warehouse and set up shop during a weekend this summer. Park officials discovered the damage caused by the marmot the following Monday.

By then, the animal had chewed up some foam kayak seats, cords, cardboard boxes and numerous rubber seals around the garage doors. Some of the damaged items were incredibly difficult to reach.

Though rock chucks have been known to occasionally climb trees, this critter was able to access kayaks that were hanging 10 feet off the ground and a cardboard box that was stored 15 feet above the ground.

The kayaks with the damaged seats were retired from future use, while the cords and the rubber garage door seals were replaced. Park employees also had to disinfect and sanitize numerous items because of the animal waste that was left behind.

Marmots invade Matterhorn area

By swissinfo.ch and Radio SRF, SEP 14, 2017 – 13:38

“So sweet!”, coo the tourists. “Shoot them,” say the authorities in Zermatt, where marmots have become a plague. The furry rodents are causing damage to meadows and houses. 

Visitors to the Matterhorn region love the animals and their warning whistles. In Zermatt, there is even a marmot trail, and every kiosk sells postcards featuring the pudgy critters.

But these prized photo subjects are less popular with some of the locals. Normally, marmots live several hundred metres above the tree line. However, many have been making their burrows down in the village of Zermatt, damaging farmers’ fields. And that’s not all.

“If someone leaves a balcony door open, marmots sneak into the house. They also dig beneath retaining walls,” Romy Biner-Hauser, Zermatt’s mayor, told Swiss Public Radio, SRF. “Now we have to do something; it can’t go on like this.”

“The risk of accidents is very high when there are so many marmot holes in a meadow,” he said, remarking that he almost lost two newborn lambs that had fallen into a marmot burrow.

Yes, the groundhogs burrows are responsible for many accidents and damage to garden grown vegetation. They readily graze in the vegetation leading to rapid crop loss and damage.

These rodents are herbivores, which mean they eat vegetation. Groundhogs eat a variety of vegetation including green grasses, clover, alfalfa dandelion greens, garden vegetables such as beans, peas, and carrots, and in the fall, apples and pears. They also feed on grasses and tree barks.

Groundhogs are solitary creatures, and they spend their summers and falls stuffing themselves and taking naps in the sun. They can eat about a pound of food per sitting.

These round creatures look like little bears when they stand up on their hind legs. Groundhogs also have sharp claws that they use to dig impressive burrows in the ground. Groundhogs keep their burrows tidy by changing out the nesting found inside from time to time.

A groundhog’s burrow can be anywhere from 8 to 66 feet long, with multiple exits and a number of chambers. These holes aerate the soil and provide excellent escape hatches for many other animals, but they are dangerous to livestock and farm machinery. They are often thought of as a “valuable nuisance”.

Those impressive tunneling skills cause problems for farmers; tractors can break an axle driving over them or people can trip in one of the holes and break a leg.

Typically, they have a burrow in the woods for the winter and a burrow in grassy areas for the warmer months. It is estimated that a woodchuck chucks wood about 700 lbs.

They are the rodents considered as an annoying pest when it comes to inhabiting your place which may sometimes cause a mess especially if they are hunting for food and may eventually cause some unnecessary destruction within your property.

To avoid such hassle there are many things that you can do to rid yourself with your groundhogs problem.

Usually, the methods used to control the groundhogs are shooting, trapping, or treating their home by lethal gases but all these methods seem to be unsuccessful in reducing marmots damage.

Rather than being unsuccessful, the methods are leading to the extinction of the species. Hence to maintain the ecological balance you need an eco-friendly way to combat against these large critters.

C Tech Corporation’s RodrepelTM fulfills all you require. RodrepelTM is an extremely low toxicity and extremely low hazard, non-carcinogenic and non-mutagenic anti-rodent pest repellent.

RodrepelTM is manufactured by using the mother’s nature gift of senses bestowed to these rodents. It is developed by using green chemistry and modern technology. It does not kill or harm the targeted as well as non-targeted species.

RodrepelTM is available in the form of a masterbatch, liquid concentrate, and lacquer. RodrepelTM masterbatch can be incorporated in the polymer-based products like wires, cables, pipes, agricultural films, equipment polymer parts, etc.

RodrepelTM liquid concentrate and lacquer are the topical applications which can be applied on the surfaces of the application.

The product is compliant with ROHS, ROHS2, ISO, REACH, APVMA, NEA, EU-BPR, and FIFRA exempted.

Contact us at technical.marketing@ctechcorporation.com if you’re facing problems with rodents and get best remedies to combat the pest menace.

Also, visit our websites:

http://www.ctechcorporation.com/
http://www.rodrepel.com/
http://www.termirepel.com/
http://www.combirepel.com/

Follow our Facebook pages at:

1] https://www.facebook.com/Combirepel-411710912249274/
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Martens:Your co-passenger

Who are Martens? Do they harm us!! Let’s find the answer to these questions below.

Martens are slender, agile animals, adapted to living in taigas, and are found in coniferous and northern deciduous forests across the Northern Hemisphere. They have bushy tails, and large paws with partially retractable claws.

An average pine marten measures between 45 and 58cm (17 to 22in) with the tail adding between 16 and 28cm (6.3 and 11cm) to their length. Due to a large geographical range they can vary greatly in size. Males are often 10-30% larger than females. They weigh between 0.9 and 2kg (2-4.5lbs) on average.

Pine martens live for up to 18 years in captivity but more often live for 8-10 years in the wild.

This species is an omnivore. The majority of their diet consists of small mammals and birds which are supplemented with fruits, insects, carrion, eggs, and fungi. Berries become a large part of their diet throughout autumn. Martens are attracted to the smell of the polymer.

Martens invade engine bays because they are drawn in by the warmth and safety of the enclosed engine bay or by the smell of urine and feces from other martens. Once inside, they bite into hoses and wires to make space for them or just for fun. They also urinate and leave bite marks in plastic and rubber as a way to mark their territory.

Martens love to chew on rubber and plastic. The most common victims of Martens’ ridiculously sharp teeth are spark plug wires, coolant hoses, wiper fluid hoses, rubber CV axle boots, rubber steering rack bellows, wiring insulation and under hood sound deadening material.

A hole in a coolant hose can cause a car to overheat, crack a cylinder head, blow a head gasket, or even seize all potentially catastrophic for a car and driving with a chewed-up ignition wire can lead to a misfiring engine, meaning unburned fuel will enter the exhaust stream and lead to destruction of catalytic converters, and those things aren’t cheap to replace.

The worst part of all this is that some insurance plans only cover replacement of the chewed-on plastic or rubber part and not the resulting damage. In other words, some insurance will only cover the coolant hose, not the blown head gasket; the spark plug wire, but not the blown catalytic converter which will burn a hole in the consumers’ pockets

Their methods to protect cars against these critters i.e. by using wire mesh under the engine bay or by using ultrasonic sound (which tends to be damped by the various parts in the engine bay) Martens get used to these and they find ways to get past closures.

Let us have a look at the below news articles.

Stone martens are coming for your car.

16 July 2009

This article was published in the local.

The stone marten may look like a cute wild mammal, but the German Hunter’s Association (DJV) warned on Thursday that the predator’s breeding habits is damaging more cars than ever. The furry martens – akin to ferrets and weasels – damaged 180,000 cars in 2007 – an increase of one-third from the previous year.

The nocturnal omnivores, also known as beech martens, live near developed areas and tend to mark vehicles with their scent during mating season.

In 2007, stone martens cost car owners an estimated €40 million in damages by chewing through cables and wires in engines.

The DJV recommended frequent car washes to remove the animals’ scent, especially if they have caused damage to the car in the past.

Some automakers also offer a preventative system that delivers small electric shocks near the car engine if martens try to get too close.

Help, martens have invaded my car!

15th  September, 2017

This Article was published in wort.lu

I’ve noticed these long, thin, ferret-like creatures roaming the streets in my village at night. What I didn’t realize was that they have been looking for a bed for the night, and that bed has been under the bonnet of our car.

I noticed the screen wash had run out, and when I got home, I dutifully refilled it. Then I tried it out. Nothing happened.

I lifted the bonnet and discovered that the rubber connecting tube had been cut. It must have been vandalsAfter further inspection, I uncovered a piece of chewed rubber, about the size of a small mouth, lying on the engine. Aha, I deduced – so something has bitten it! At last came the small moment of wonder when you learn something you thought you never would. My ‘vandal’ had actually been a marten, which apparently loves to nibble at any rubber tubing or wires that get in the way of a good night’s sleep.

What’s more, these little sharp-toothed cuties can do much worse than bite through your screen washer. They’ve been known to nibble on spark-plug wires and coolant hoses and crunch through brake hoses and ignition wiring. Electric hybrid cars, with all those additional wires, are the most susceptible to costly damage.

Earlier this year, the Wort reported that three baby martens were found in an engine compartment in Niederanven.

It appears there is little we can do about these critters. Ultrasonic devices and things that give martens an electric shock only work to a limited extent. They are also a protected species, for those of you who have more menacing ideas.

There were also similar incidents reported in different parts of counties.

There needs to be an alternate solution for this as martens are a worldwide phenomenon. They cause of path of destruction wherever they go and it needs to be stopped effectively and immediately keeping the ecology in mind.

C Tech Corporation  has come up with such a unique and ideal alternative: RodrepelTM

RodrepelTM is a non-toxic, non-hazardous and environmentally safe anti-rodent additive for masterbatches specially developed for a range of polymeric and coating applications. It is also effective in case the target species is birds and other animals. This product works on the mechanism of repellency. It does not kill the target species, and also does not affect the application it is used in. It is available in masterbatches, liquid concentrate or lacquer form.

This product does not leach out of the end application and is thus Non-hazardous.

It does not affect the humans coming in contact with the application they are incorporated in.

And moreover, last but not the least, it does not kill the animal but only repels them. Thus it is ECO-FRIENDLY.

The product is compliant with ROHS, ROHS2, ISO, REACH, APVMA, NEA, EU-BPR, and FIFRA exempted.

Contact us at technical.marketing@ctechcorporation.com if you’re facing problems with rodents and get best remedies to combat the pest menace.

Also, visit our websites:

http://www.ctechcorporation.com/
http://www.rodrepel.com/
http://www.termirepel.com/
http://www.combirepel.com/

Follow our Facebook pages at:

1] https://www.facebook.com/Combirepel-411710912249274/
2] https://www.facebook.com/Termirepel-104225413091251/
3] https://www.facebook.com/Rodrepel-120734974768048/

Follow us on our Twitter pages at:

1] https://twitter.com/rodrepel
2] https://twitter.com/termirepel
3] https://twitter.com/combirepel

Spinal cord of Indian Air Force: Wire and Cable system

The Indian Air Force is the air arm of the Indian armed forces. Its complement of personnel and aircraft assets ranks fourth amongst the air forces of the world. Its primary mission is to secure Indian airspace and to conduct aerial warfare during an armed conflict.

Airforce is upholding this rank due to its strong wire and cable system. Wires and cables are the carriers of loads of information. Hence are responsible for the smooth functioning and proper communication within forces. Effective communication is vital to any mission’s success, so it’s essential to any system have the means to do so.

Wires and cables work through the signal system. Signaling in any air force system plays an important role. All the air crafts are connected to the air force base through this signaling system. The various actions are taken place depending upon the signals received. The signals are transmitted through the different types of wires and cables. They include Coaxial cables, Fibre Optic cables, Jelly filled cables, Armored cables, Non-armored cables, Kapton wires, Poly-X wires, Teflon wires, etc.

The traditional types of cables used in air force are mostly Armored Cables (AC) and Metal-Clad Cables (MC).  Their flexible metal armor provides mechanical protection to the electrical conductors while enabling them to bend around corners. The cables are pre-wired at the factory eliminating the need to pull conductors into a raceway, which in turn greatly reduces the possibility of conductor damage. AC & MC cable does the job in less space, with fewer bending restrictions as well as less cutting and connecting than most other wiring products.

Armored cables feature some type of metal sheath that is the first layer of armor. It is usually made of interlocking or continuous aluminum or stainless steel, or it can be covered in a smooth or corrugated metal tape. Metal-clad cables are typically galvanized steel or aluminum interlocking cable.

Armored and Metal-clad cables are installed specially for providing protection. But do they provide protection from pests? The answer is no and here are some of the pieces of evidence.

How One Nuclear Missile Base Is Battling Ground Squirrels

In Montana, squirrels have been tunneling under a base’s fences and setting off intruder alarms, prompting researchers to strengthen its defenses

By Joseph Stromberg, SMITHSONIAN.COM , AUGUST 30, 2013

Malmstrom Air Force Base, in Western Montana, is home to 150 Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missiles, each tipped with a nuclear warhead.

In recent years, the base has been dealing with an enemy so relentless that they’ve been forced to call in outside help to defend against it. That fearsome enemy is a species of rodent known as Richardson’s ground squirrel.

The squirrels, each about a foot long and 1-2 pounds, dig extensive underground tunnel networks (they’ve been known to excavate tunnel systems more than 30 feet in length).

“Anything that breaches the perimeter fence will set off the motion detector,” says Gary Witmer of the National Wildlife Research Center, the latter a USDA-funded organization that deals with human-animal conflicts and was called in to help at Malmstrom.

Additionally, over time, the rodents have started damaging the base’s physical infrastructure. “They’re burrowing under foundations, undermining road beds and gnawing on cables,” Witmer says.

Rats on a plane! Aircraft carrying 200 passengers overrun with stowaway rodents is grounded amid fears they would chew through electrical wires

By Chris Kitching

PUBLISHED: 16:13 BST, 6 August 2014 | UPDATED: 17:21 BST, 6 August 2014

The aircraft’s crew noticed the rodent stowaways scurrying free in the rear half of the cabin as the plane, carrying about 200 passengers and staff, landed at New Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport from Calcutta.

After flight AI021 landed safely and pulled up to the gate, the crew cleared everyone off the Airbus A321 and had it taken out of service, the Times of India reported. Rats! This is at least the third time in the last five years rodents have been found on an Air India flight

Normally, the plane would have been prepared for the next flight, but it was taken to a remote bay to be fumigated in an effort to exterminate the vermin.

The discovery of rats in the cabin may seem like a comical end to a flight but the tiny intruders risked throwing the plane into complete chaos, as they posed a serious threat to the safety of the passengers and crew.

An unnamed official told the Times of India: ‘Rats on board an aircraft can lead to a catastrophe if they start chewing up electric wires of a fly by wire plane. ‘If that happens, pilots will have no control on any system on board leading to a disaster.’

An Air India official, speaking on condition of anonymity, told Agence France-Presse rats on planes are a ‘common phenomenon’ worldwide and they could ‘get in anywhere’, although they normally sneak onto aircraft via catering vehicles loaded with food.

Hence though they may seem harmless; insects, rodents and birds can significantly impair the operations on any Air Force base. It’s the responsibility of Pest Management specialists to take the necessary actions to control and prevent pest infestations. We need to do everything from keeping bases free of pests that could carry debilitating infectious diseases to repelling birds from airfields to ensure safe takeoff and landings, protection of health and safety of everyone on base.

For the complete protection from pest infestation we provide a permanent solution. We at  C Tech Corporation have come up with an effective solution. The products are developed with a base of green technology. We have RodrepelTM  an extremely low toxicity and extremely low hazard and eco-friendly, non-dangerous and environmentally safe rodent repellent.

Our product is available in the form of a masterbatch, which can be directly incorporated in the application while manufacturing and in form of lacquer that can be directly applied as a top coat on the surface of application. RodrepelTM  does not kill but only keeps the rodents away by making use of their sensory mechanisms.

The product functions from a distance due to the peculiar smell which generates a typical fear response in rodents. Rodents are further restricted from biting the applications treated with our products due to advanced mechanisms like dermal irritation, extremely bitter taste, sensory stimuli modification etc.

Further, they acquire a fear towards the RodrepelTM containing products which make them stay away from the application. Thus, RodrepelTM actually helps in modifying rodent behavior. Rodents being social animals also communicate the bad experience to their population in the vicinity. Hence by using RodrepelTM  one can have a long-term solution. We at  C Tech Corporation are committed to our environment & we believe that no harm must be caused to animals or to the environment.

The product is compliant with ROHS, ROHS2, ISO, REACH, APVMA, NEA, EU-BPR, and FIFRA exempted.

Contact us at technical.marketing@ctechcorporation.com if you’re facing problems with rodents and get best remedies to combat the pest menace.

Also, visit our websites:

http://www.ctechcorporation.com/
http://www.rodrepel.com/
http://www.termirepel.com/
http://www.combirepel.com/

Follow our Facebook pages at:

1] https://www.facebook.com/Combirepel-411710912249274/
2] https://www.facebook.com/Termirepel-104225413091251/
3] https://www.facebook.com/Rodrepel-120734974768048/

Follow us on our Twitter pages at:

1] https://twitter.com/rodrepel
2] https://twitter.com/termirepel
3] https://twitter.com/combirepel

Troublesome squirrels

Just imagine a beautiful Sunday afternoon, with no one to disturb you are enjoying your favorite TV series while lounging on a comfy couch. What more could one wish for?

But heaven forbid, if this perfect setting is ruined by a sudden and unanticipated power cut, know that it’s mischief of a little ninja trying to experiment its weapons on your TV cable, leaving you with nothing but exasperation!!!

While there are many causes for power outages ranging from fallen branches to cable failure, but believe it or not, a well-co-ordinated rodent assault can be undoubtedly accused guilty in disrupting and frustrating thousands of people at a time, switching off our electrified lives for hours.  Their cute and furry façade often masks their propensity of gnawing on underground cables, and on top of it, these little nut eaters continue showing no sign of penitence for their wrongdoing!!!

Well-known rodent like squirrels, characterized by two pairs of unremittingly growing incisors in each of the upper and lower jaws are doubtlessly causing havoc in the telecommunication arena.

Squirrels, otherwise known for their robust bodies, short limbs, and long tails, have topped the list in posing a great threat to our electrical grids!!! Squirrels are members of the family Sciuridae, consisting of small or medium-sized rodents. They are indigenous to the Americas, Eurasia, and Africa, and have been introduced to Australia. Like all rodents, squirrels have four incisors that grow continuously throughout their life.

Apart from crunchy nuts and fresh berries, these little invaders prefer nibbling on the aerial cable routes, thus damaging them along with increased maintenance expenses. They chew up the copper wires from metallic cables as well as fibers from optical cables. Damage to these fibers optic cables can cause shut down vital communication links to airports, emergency services, and Nuclear power facilities. Therefore protecting these ‘information canals’ has an ever-increasing significance.

In this battle of network vs. squirrels, even the transformers do not get an exemption. Squirrels burrow their way into transformers for the same reason they enter rotting cavities of aging trees: hollow spaces offer them den sites and safety from predators.

One might wonder the need for these notorious mammals being so interested in closely exploring the cables, even when these cables don’t suit their palate? The answer is simple; Most of the time squirrels gnaw to fulfill a portion of their dietary habits – opening hard-shelled nuts. If, however, squirrels do not have an adequate dietary reason or opportunity to exercise their incisors, there is a danger of the teeth “overgrowing”. In these cases, the incisors can prevent the squirrel’s mouth from closing (severely restricting its ability to eat), or the teeth may actually cause injury to the animal, including puncturing the roof of the mouth. If squirrels have need of wearing down their incisors, and there are no other hard substances nearby, they will gnaw on cable. Cable components such as polyethylene and aluminum shielding handily meet the needs of squirrels in the neighborhood when it comes to oral maintenance.

  • Squirrel Causes Power Outage in Bartlesville
    15th May 2016,NewsOn6.com, Bartlesville, USA

 Public Service of Oklahoma reports a problem with a squirrel caused power outages in some parts of Bartlesville. Spokesperson Tiffini Jackson said the squirrel got into a transmission line which overloaded an underground line. That caused a feeder station to go out. At its peak, about 2,000 customers were without electricity. PSO was able to re-route, and that number was down to under 700 customers around 9 a.m., according to Jackson. Power was restored before 11 a.m. The squirrel did not survive.

·         Squirrel blamed for Southgate School power outage in Kennewick
9th May 2016, Tri City Herald, Kennewick

A squirrel is to blame for a power and internet outage in central Kennewick on Monday morning. The outage happened near Morain Street and North 19th Avenue and knocked out power to Southgate Elementary School, the Sun Meadows Mobile Home Park and neighboring homes.

·         Squirrel causes power outage

10th May 2016, The Gaffney Ledger, USA

Another bushy-tailed, nut-loving menace wreaked havoc on the Board of Public Works’ electrical grid. A squirrel squirmed into the Suez Street substation, causing a 90-minute outage at Gaffney High before meeting an untimely death.

 

According to Cyber Squirrel’s data, till the year 2015 there have been about 714 squirrel related power outages.

It’s high time now, to show these cyber terrorists that we humans are capable in combating their continuous attacks. For this we require a long-term and sure shot solution that would keep these away from optical and metallic cables, thus preventing any further losses.

C Tech Corporation can offer a solution to overcome the damage caused by squirrels. Rodrepel™ is a non-toxic, non-hazardous, non-carcinogenic and environmentally safe, anti-rodent additive. The masterbatch of Rodrepel™ can be incorporated in wires and cables and other polymeric applications. Rodrepel™ lacquer can be added to paints which can be applied to the already installed cables.

RodrepelTM does not kill but repel. It is engineered using a unique set of complex compounds. It follows 6 pronged strategy which is extremely effective on rodents like squirrel, rat, beaver, gopher, paca, marmot etc.

Rodrepel™ is cost-effective, inert, and thermally stable and does not degrade on exposure to heat and sunlight. It does not volatilize and does not degrade in the soil.

The product is compliant with ROHS, ROHS2, ISO, REACH, APVMA, NEA, EU-BPR, and FIFRA exempted.

Contact us at technical.marketing@ctechcorporation.com if you’re facing problems with rodents and get best remedies to combat the pest menace.

Also, visit our websites:

http://www.ctechcorporation.com/
http://www.rodrepel.com/
http://www.termirepel.com/
http://www.combirepel.com/

Follow our Facebook pages at:

1] https://www.facebook.com/Combirepel-411710912249274/
2] https://www.facebook.com/Termirepel-104225413091251/
3] https://www.facebook.com/Rodrepel-120734974768048/

Follow us on our Twitter pages at:

1] https://twitter.com/rodrepel
2] https://twitter.com/termirepel
3] https://twitter.com/combirepel

 

 

 

Telepathic rats

“Hey brother, have you checked out this new restaurant at St. Martin Street? Let’s check out their pantry today” this could be one of the normal day to day conversations that rodents have.

But how do they communicate? How does an aged rat share his words of wisdom with his grandchildren; how do rats have their intense discussions on the potential spots for harborage and food for their family. Of course, they do not have 6500 types of languages as we do. Then how do they pass on the information that they gather? Let us decode the secret that these “telepathic rats” use to transmit messages.

Rats are blessed with a very strong sense of smell and taste. They have about 500 to 1000 types of olfactory receptors, coded for by between 500 and 1,000 genes, and one out of every 100 genes is involved in the detection of odors. The rat’s sense of smell registers not only average scents but also the presence of chemicals that denote a change in atmosphere or emotion.

The journey of any odorant dispersed in the air begins by first passing through a patch of skin rich with smell receptors and olfactory neurons, which are tipped with hair-like cilia. Smell particles bind to the cilia. From here the odorant makes its way to the olfactory bulbs where they meet about 2000 baskets like structures called ‘glomeruli’. The journey ends with the activation of glomeruli which results in giving a perception of smell to the rat. Different patterns of glomeruli are activated when a rat smells different odors.

Now to communicate information amongst each other rodents make use of their second type of sense organ known as the Vomeronasal organ (VNO), which primarily detects ‘pheromones’, the chemical signals transmitted between members of the same species. Pheromones are mainly found in rat’s excreta, urine and also in any other glandular secretions.

For example, consider a case of automobiles. If a rat finds a car suitable and safe for shelter, hiding or for storing food, mice living hundreds of miles away will gain this knowledge through pheromones. The little critter simply marks the car with a peculiar scent. So even if you get rid of a rat today, there is always a possibility of future infestations due to this internal communication between them.

Another very interesting phenomenon observed in rats is their way of carrying forwarding valuable information to the coming generations for dealing with many difficult situations they need to face.

For example, every rat’s environment is filled with many potential foods and with many non-consumable foods like poisons, rocks, plastics and so forth. Then how does the rat figure out what to eat?

Before birth: In utero, fetal rats detect odor-bearing particles that come from their mother’s diet and cross the placental barrier. Shortly after birth, newborn rats respond positively to these foods. Therefore, they start learning about what to eat from their mother before they’re even born.

During nursing: Nursing rats receive information about their mother’s diet through her milk. They prefer the foods she ate during lactation.

Weaning: When young rats are weaning and eating solid foods for the first time, they use adult rats as guides. They forage where the adults are foraging or where adults have previously scent-marked.

Adolescence and adulthood: When rats forage on their own, their food choices are influenced by social interactions that may take place far away from foraging sites. They smell foods on the fur, whiskers and especially the breath of other rats and strongly prefer the foods that those rats had consumed.

Also, a study conducted by neuroscientists at Emory University found that fear can travel quickly through generations of mice DNA

In the experiment, researchers taught male mice to fear the smell of cherry blossoms by associating the scent with mild foot shocks. Two weeks later, they bred with females. The resulting pups were raised to adulthood having never been exposed to the smell.

Yet when the critters caught a whiff of it for the first time, they suddenly became anxious and fearful. They were even born with more cherry-blossom-detecting neurons in their noses and more brain space devoted to cherry-blossom-smelling.

The memory transmission extended out another generation when these male mice bred, and similar results were found.

Rats cause huge damages in many areas like automobiles, agriculture, electronics, gas sector, hotel industries etc. The loss is even more due to their ability to transmit information amongst each other regarding the vulnerable targets to attack. Thus we need a solution.

At  C Tech Corporation we make use of the mother nature’s gift of senses to these rodents in formulating an extremely low toxicity and extremely low hazard and environmental products which act as repellants and do not kill.

RodrepelTM  is an extremely low toxicity and extremely low hazard and eco-friendly rodent aversive. RodrepelTM is available in form of masterbatches, liquid concentrate and lacquer and is specially designed for polymeric applications. It can be incorporated into nearly all base polymers like HDPE, MDPE, LDPE, PVC, PE, etc.

The mechanism followed by our product is repellence, it affects their olfactory senses and prevents them from attacking the substrate and also does not aid in killing the target species. The product does not interfere with the working of the end application it is used in. It is stable at high temperatures; does not leach out or produce any toxic fumes and has a long shelf life.

The product is compliant with ROHS, ROHS2, ISO, REACH, APVMA, NEA, EU-BPR, and FIFRA exempted.

Contact us at technical.marketing@ctechcorporation.com if you’re facing problems with rodents and get best remedies to combat the pest menace.

Also, visit our websites:

http://www.ctechcorporation.com/
http://www.rodrepel.com/
http://www.termirepel.com/
http://www.combirepel.com/

Follow our Facebook pages at:

1] https://www.facebook.com/Combirepel-411710912249274/
2] https://www.facebook.com/Termirepel-104225413091251/
3] https://www.facebook.com/Rodrepel-120734974768048/

Follow us on our Twitter pages at:

1] https://twitter.com/rodrepel
2] https://twitter.com/termirepel
3] https://twitter.com/combirepel

Rodents- Threat to Horticulture

Growing your own vegetables is both fun and rewarding. Fresh, luscious vegetables nurtured with care in gardens, backyards, nurseries, vineyards undoubtedly beat the frozen stuff, adding both tastes as well as nutritive value to your food. However, it is an absolute nightmare when trees grown with so much care are damaged by some pesky little rodents.

Rodents damage the fruits, vegetables and other produce in many ways. The first type includes damage to seeds and seedlings in nurseries by rats and squirrels. The second type involves stunted growth and drying up of trees due to gnawing and nibbling of the roots of saplings and young trees. Such damage may occur in orchards of pecan, apple, peach and other fruit crops. The third type is the main cause of loss and it involves damage to the fruits generally by the climbing and arboreal species like R. rattus, R. r. wroughtoni, R. r. andamanensis, F. pennanti, F. palmarum and F. tristriatus. Some fruits like the pomegranate and strawberries which may hang from their bushy plants close to the ground level are also attacked by the ground-dwelling rodents like T. indica, R. meltada, M. hurrianae and B. bengalensis.

Not only the produce, rodents also chew holes on plastic pots and other horticultural tools. Rodents are blessed with two pairs of ever-growing incisors. In order to keep these incisors sharp and also to avoid their overgrowth, rodents need to constantly gnaw on hard objects. Polymeric applications in horticulture like plastic pots, gardening tools, trickle tube systems, wires in the movers, tillers top their snack list due to their smooth texture, the bright colors and the odor that they exude.

Let us have a look at the various effects of rodent damages to our horticultural produce and tools. Crop contamination due to rodents is one of the major undesirable effects of rodent attack. Damage to the trickle tube systems could result in loss of water and additional replacement and repair cost. Also, chewed wires are unsafe sites for electrical dangers. Breathing the air which is contaminated by rodent droppings, urine, and other secretion can result in spreading of dangerous viruses and diseases.

The results of a 2012 survey on wildlife damage by APHIS identified, damage caused by rodents as sixth on our overall list of horticulture crop predators. Also it is estimated that about 50% of farm fires in the UK can be attributed to rats gnawing electrical cables, while a recent Bayer survey found rodent damage to seasonal machinery such as combine harvesters in store can be a very costly problem.  

Let us have a look at some incidences of rodent damage in this sector:

  • Pest parrot search in Katikati
    February 4th 2016, TOI Moana

Rainbow lorikeets eat fruit and breed rapidly so they could cause serious crop damage and costs for orchard and vineyard owners.

  • Stink bugs a resilient foe for Mount Airy vineyards

September 24th 2010, Gazette. Net, USA

The Asian stink bug, an invasive pest with no natural predators to keep its numbers in check, has begun to invade Maryland vineyards after a summer of gorging its way through orchards, cornfields and gardens.

  • Rabbit Damage to Trees and Shrubs

March 17th 2010, Horticulture & Home Pest News, USA

Deep snow and extended period of snow cover posed serious problems for rabbits. Denied access to food on the ground, rabbits fed extensively on small trees and shrubs that stuck above the snow.

It is high time to look into this problem of pest damage to the trees, vegetables, fruits etc. We just cannot afford to lose our produce. We need a solution to this problem.

We at C Tech Corporation have come up with a solution to this problem. Our product RodrepelTM  is an extremely low toxic, non-hazardous rodent aversive. This product acts through a series of highly developed intricate mechanism ensuring that rodents are kept away from the target application. The product is compliant with ROHS, ROHS2, ISO, REACH, APVMA, NEA, EU-BPR, and FIFRA exempted. We do not aim at disturbing the ecosystem designed by nature. Our eco-friendly products do not kill the target species but only repel them.

Our products are available in form of solid masterbatches, liquid concentrate and lacquer form.

Our solid masterbatch can be incorporated in plastic pots, growing &transport trays, turfs, trickle tube systems etc. On the other hand, lacquer and liquid concentrate can be coated over the fencing, wooden support in trellis system, raised beds, tree guard etc. to protect them from the pest attacks.