All posts by rodrepelnewblogeditor

Rodrepel (TM): Your rescue against beaver


The beaver is a large, primarily nocturnal, semiaquatic rodent. They are the second-largest rodent in the world. They have a number of adaptations that make them adept swimmers including webbed feet and a broad, flat tail that is covered with scales. They also have an extra set of eyelids which are transparent and close over their eyes enabling beavers to see while underwater. Beavers also seem to use their tails to regulate their body temperature. The tail is not well insulated, so when a beaver is too hot it can offload excess body heat through its tail.

Beavers have very large teeth in proportion to their skull. The incisors have a structure that means they are self-sharpening. Their incisors grow at an angle towards the beaver’s left eye. The outer surface is coated in enamel and the inner surface coated in dentine. This enamel is orange to chestnut brown in color. The softer dentine erodes faster than the hard enamel, maintaining a sharp cutting edge as the beaver gnaws. Beaver’s incisors grow at the fairly nifty speed of almost 0.5 cm a month. The top and bottom teeth keep each other sharp. This is in large part down to its powerful jaw muscles, which give it a far larger bite force for its body size than most other rodents. Beavers’ teeth grow continuously throughout their lives. As beavers chew through tree trunks and bark, their teeth get worn down, so the continuous growth of their teeth ensures they always have a sharp set of teeth available to them. To further assist them in their chewing endeavors, beavers have strong jaw muscles and significant biting strength. Beavers can unleash nearly 180 pounds of biting force per square inch, compared to the human’s 88 pounds.

Beavers are well known for the thunderous warning slaps or splashes of their tails that alert other family members to the presence of intruders. A beaver colony marks an area by building mounds of mud near the lodge and dam near trails. On these mounds, which usually vary from 2-7 in numbers and are 5.0-7.5 cm.

Beaver Kills Belarus Man With Deadly Bite

11th April 2013

The below article is written by Mr. Daniel D. Snyder from outsideonline.com

 

A man in Belarus found out the hard way that beavers are not to be trifled with. The unidentified victim was on a fishing trip with two friends at Lake Shestakov when they spotted the massive rodent on the side of the road. The man approached the beaver intending to take its picture when the creature pounced and bit him in the thigh. The bite severed a main artery and the man bled to death.

Beaver attacks are a rarity, but the animals can become more aggressive at about two years of age when they leave their colony to find a mate. Beavers can unleash nearly 180 pounds of biting force per square inch, compared to the human’s 88 pounds.

Last July, two girls were attacked by a beaver by while swimming in a lake in Virginia. There were no fatalities, save for the beaver, who was shot. A month later, a boy scout leader was attacked while swimming in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. The beaver was brought down by a group of angry, rock-wielding boy scouts. Again, there were no fatalities, but the scout leader had to receive treatment for rabies.

Beaver knocks out power to thousands after chewing down pole near Prince Albert

Oct 30, 2017

The city of Prince Albert, Sask., and a large chunk of northern Saskatchewan lost power for about an hour after a beaver partially chewed through a power pole southeast of the city on Sunday.

SaskPower is calling this a very Canadian problem.

“This was one of our larger wooden power poles and there was ample evidence of beaver damage at the base of it, so beavers had been chewing away at it,” said spokesperson Jonathan Tremblay.

Animals account for roughly one-third of the power outages experienced by SaskPower customers.

“Usually, it’s birds flying into substations, or squirrels chewing at things they shouldn’t,” he said.

In May, the Crown utility had to repair another line after beavers gnawed through a pole in the southwest.

Beavers are more active this time of year, as young beaver kits are pushed out of lodges.

While SaskPower was able to reroute power around the area, people near the village of Weldon were without power for nearly five hours.

To deal with the problem of these beavers there is only one effective solution: Rodrepel™, a unique and non-toxic product of C Tech Corporation. Rodrepel™ is a non-toxic, non-hazardous and environment-friendly rodent repellent. Rodrepel™ is available in three forms solid masterbatch, liquid concentrate, and lacquer. Masterbatch can be used for various polymeric applications and can be incorporated while manufacturing. Liquid Concentrate can be added in an organic and inorganic application for painting as a topical application. Lacquer can be directly applied in the installed application. The unique quality that makes Rodrepel™ different from the conventional methods is that it works on the mechanism of repellency.

Contact us, for any problems with rodents and animals, both!

www.ctechcorporation.com

www.termirepel.com

www.combirepel.com

www.rodrepel.com

 

 

 

 

Are these little critters taking over your attic?

Innocent and playful might be the words you associate with squirrels. These critters can be cute but they can also be a menace. Squirrels are usually not harmful when they are living in your trees, but they can be very destructive and a health hazard once they invade your home.  As squirrels have litters of babies twice a year, once in the spring and once in the fall, they are constantly looking for sheltered areas to build their nests. Attics and soffit areas make ideal nesting location for squirrels. Squirrels get into the attic by chewing holes from the outside, typically above gutters, or at construction gaps where dormers meet the roofline. They may also gain entry to attics by chewing corners of trim or any other weak area that allows them access into the attic space. Their heights provide protection from predators and humans and allow squirrels to remain warm and dry through inclement weather.

Squirrels commonly cause damage to attic insulation, or chew wires in the attic. Squirrels chew on wires to sharpen, strengthen and control the growth of their teeth. And once they’ve chewed their way through, exposed wires become a major safety concern. Exposed wires can cause unexplained service interruptions, start fires or even electrocute anyone who touches them. As more litters of squirrels are born in or near the home, these squirrels will grow up, leave the nest and search for new areas within the attic to build their own nests.  They continuously gnaw on something in order to reduce their incisors that can cause thousands of dollars in building damage. As long as the squirrels continue to stay in the attics they will try to create more entry points.

Squirrels have also been known to chew through PVC piping. Imagine the destruction that could be caused by a damaged water line in your attic!

Let us look at some incidences where squirrel have severely damaged the attics and which lead to great financial loss:

Squirrels are £20 million menace to homeowners

01 Mar 2011, The telegraph

Squirrels have been blamed for causing more than £20 million of damage to homes in Britain, including gnawed roof beams and chewed wiring. Last year, Glen and Laura Borner’s three-bedroom home in Hertfordshire burned down after squirrels chewed through electrical wiring in the loft.

Besides the estimated £20 million of damage to properties, the Forestry Commission said that squirrels also caused more than £10 million.

Flying squirrels and indoor snow make life miserable for Edina condo owner

DECEMBER 12, 2015, Star tribune

When the flying-squirrel guy told Tina Nelson that it was snowing in her attic, she knew things were getting out of hand at her Edina condo.

That was almost two years ago. Since then, the squirrels infesting her attic have been removed and the openings that let them in, along with the snow, have been closed. But Nelson continues to complain of problems with her unit at the Village Homes of Edinborough complex.

Seemingly the attacks by squirrels can cost us dearly in terms of monetary value as well as human life. It is imperative that we take steps to control and contain this damage. Conventional methods of dealing with these creatures include use of toxic chemical additives and trapping. Along the years each of these tried and tested methods have failed at some level due to a variety of reasons but not restricted to corrosion, adaptability of rodents, development of immunity to traditional poisons, etc.

They play a vital role in our ecosystem. They are great at planting trees. They bury their acorns but forget where they put them. Hence to use toxic rodenticides to prevent damage caused by squirrels will not be an ideal solution. Also, rodenticides can harm target as well as non-targeted species.

The time has come to look for a better alternative; an effective and long lasting solution. A sure shot and effective way of doing this is ensuring that these rodents are kept away from our attics for a long period of time.

Rodrepel™ a rodent and animal repellant manufactured by C Tech Corporation is ideal. Rodrepel™ is a non-toxic, non-hazardous rodent repellant available in the form of masterbatch which can be incorporated in the cable sheathing during polymer processing. Rodrepel™ in liquid form can be coated on the cable insulation to provide protection from rodents. RodrepelTM lacquer can be applied as a topical application on the attics and also on the already installed cables. This product has been engineered with precision to work on multiple levels targeting the acutely developed sense of the rodents. It also targets the other olfactory senses causing temporary discomfort ensuring the rodent stays away from the end application.

In our war against these four-legged terrorists, Rodrepel™ promises to be a reliable and promising weapon, making it our weapon of choice.

Contact us if you are facing problems against these little critters and also against aggressive animals as well as termites and insects.

www.ctechcorporation.com

www.rodrepel.com

www.termirepel.com

www.combirepel.com

Bear menace can’t be borne!

One little bear
Wondering what to do
Along came another
Then there were two!

You never know when a couple of these wondering animals end up doing dreadful things!

Recently these bears were just wondering and they ended up visiting a pizza store in Colorado on a pizza eating spree, gobbling up the dough in the fridge before moving on to the salami.

Bears come in many different colors, shape, and sizes and they live all over the world, except Antarctica and Australia.  Their habitats range from the snowy northern tundra to dense rainforests and high mountains.  Most species of bears live to around 25 years of age. There are eight different species of bears.  They are Asiatic, Black, Brown, Polar, Panda, Sloth, Spectacled and Sun.  Some of these species have a few sub-species.

Common characteristics of modern bears include large bodies with stocky legs, long snouts, small rounded ears, shaggy hair; plant grade paws with five non-retractile claws, and short tails. While the polar bear is mostly carnivorous, and the giant panda feeds almost entirely on bamboo, the remaining six species are omnivorous with varied diets. With the exception of courting individuals and mothers with their young, bears are typically solitary animals.

As scavengers, bears will go through garbage cans and are often spotted at garbage dumps and campsites.  Insects, nuts, berries, sap, branches, and roots are a big part of a bear’s diet. Adults are solitary and usually avoid contact with humans; however, they may attack if starving or to protect cubs. Bears are large and can be quite intimidating so they don’t have many enemies.  Their biggest enemies are humans and each other.

Although clumsy in appearance, bears can move surprisingly fast, even through dense cover that would seriously impede a human or a horse.

If captured when young, bears can be tamed quite easily and are commonly used in circus animal acts. This has often caused people to consider bears as tame and harmless rather than as potentially dangerous creatures deserving wariness and respect. This mistake has frequently resulted in tragedy for both humans and bears.

Polar bears and grizzly bears can be dangerous to people, especially when they are sharing a habitat.

Bears Caught On Video In Estes Park Pizzaria: Owners Beg Police To Spare Them

By Jean Lotus (Patch Staff) – Updated Oct 10, 2017 – Across Colorado Patch

Mama bear opens the fridge and pulls out a tray of pizza dough balls for baby to feast on, then opens cabinet storing salami.
A mama black bear and two cubs were caught pawing through pizza dough on overnight surveillance video at Antonio’s Real New York Pizza in Estes Park Oct. 8. The restaurant’s owners posted the black and white video on Facebook Sunday with a note begging the Estes Park Police Dept. and Colorado Parks and Wildlife not to euthanize the animals.

“All they want is calories with which to hibernate,” owner Antonio DeSousa wrote. “We have to come up with a better set of deterrents than creating rules which ensure their euthanization based on the need to eat.”

Western Towns Try to Stop Hungry Bears from Causing Havoc

09/18/2017 – Huffpost

In bear country, cities and counties are trying to keep bears out of town by adopting ordinances that require residents to keep their trash secure.

BOULDER, Colo. —

On a recent morning that was chilly with the first nip of fall, Brenda Lee went looking for knocked-over trash cans. She drove her car slowly through alleyways on the west side of this Colorado city, close to where streets end and the Rocky Mountains begin. The damage wasn’t hard to find.

On every block, it seemed, at least one trash can was lying on its side, spewing its contents into the street. The mess was a telltale sign that a black bear had toppled the can and clawed through the garbage looking for scraps.

Conflicts between humans and bears are increasing here and across the Western U.S. as more people move to and vacation in the bear country. Climate change could make the situation worse by disrupting bear habitat.

Somehow the nuisance caused by bears needs to be stopped.

But how?

C Tech Corporation has got a solution to keep bears away from human dwellings.

At C Tech Corporation has developed non- toxic & non- hazardous formulation!
RodrepelTM is a low-toxic, non-hazardous aversive. RodrepelTM is a perfect blend of smart technology and green chemistry. This product helps to keep the bears away from the application. The product is compliant with RoHS, RoHS 2, REACH and is FIFRA exempted. Our eco-friendly products do not kill the target species but only repel them.

The product is available in the form of a masterbatch which can be incorporated in pipes, films, cables etc. while manufacturing. While the RodrepelTM liquid concentrate (diluted in paints) and RodrepelTM lacquer solution can be coated over the applications which need protection.

Our products provide a safe and environmentally friendly solution to avoid bears.

Contact us, for any problems with bears!

www.ctechcorporation.com

www.termirepel.com

www.combirepel.com

www.rodrepel.com

They do not commit suicide: Lemmings

It is said, when overcrowding becomes an issue, they will run for the sea, throwing themselves off the cliffs for the good of the species. Lemmings can also explode.

Is it?

No, no and no. When the population becomes too dense, lemmings will seek pastures new – but they do not commit suicide and they do not explode.

Lemmings are a kind of short-tailed vole, a mouse-like rodent that favors tundra and open grasslands. A lemming is a small rodent usually found in or near the Arctic in tundra biomes. Lemmings are subnivean animals. They make up the subfamily Arvicolinae (also known as Microtinae) together with voles and muskrats, which forms part of the superfamily Muroidea, which also includes rats, mice, hamsters, and gerbils.

Lemmings weigh from 30 to 110 g (1 to 4 oz) and are about 7 to 15 cm (3 to 6 in) long. They generally have long, soft fur, and very short tails. They are herbivorous, feeding mostly on leaves and shoots, grasses, and sedges in particular, but also on roots and bulbs. At times, they will eat grubs and larvae. Like other rodents, their incisors grow continuously, allowing them to exist on much tougher forage than would otherwise be possible.

Lemmings do not hibernate through the harsh northern winter. They are masterful burrowers. They remain active, finding food by burrowing through the snow and using grasses clipped and stored in advance. They are solitary animals by nature, meeting only to mate and then going their separate ways, but like all rodents, they have a high reproductive rate and can breed rapidly when food is plentiful.

Lemmings have large population booms every three or four years. When the concentration of lemmings becomes too high in one area, a large group will set out in search of a new home. Like many other rodents, lemmings have periodic population booms and then disperse in all directions, seeking the food and shelter their natural.

The Norway lemming and brown lemming are two of the few vertebrates which reproduce so quickly that their population fluctuations are chaotic, rather than following linear growth to a carrying capacity or regular oscillations. It is not known why lemming populations fluctuate with such great variance roughly every four years before numbers drop to near extinction. For many years, the population of lemmings was believed to change with the population cycle, but now some evidence suggests their predators’ populations, particularly those of the stoat, may be more closely involved in changing the lemming population.

Lemming behavior and appearance are markedly different from those of other rodents, which are inconspicuously colored and try to conceal themselves from their predators. Lemmings, by contrast, are conspicuously colored and behave aggressively towards predators and even human observers. The lemming defense system is thought to be based on warning display. They use their defense mechanism to attack their predators and humans.

In the below news article we can notice that these pretty looking creatures can be destructive:

When lemmings ATTACK: Aggressive rodents use multicolored fur and loud shrieks to warn predators to stay away

By Richard Gray for Mail Online Published:  6 February 2015

They may have a reputation for committing suicide, but it appears that lemmings actually have a powerful survival mechanism.

Biologists have found that the furry Scandinavian rodents use their multicolored fur and emit loud screams to scare away predators.

They say that the rodents employ a form of aposematism – the use of colors and other signals to warn that an animal is toxic or dangerous.

However, in the case of Norwegian lemmings, they back up the message from their yellow, brown and white fur and loud barking calls with some aggressive biting.
Unlike other rodents, the creatures are known to fight back against attackers with loud screams, lunges and biting their sharp teeth.

You can seek help from C Tech Corporation to get rid of menace cause by lemmings.

At C Tech Corporation we make use of Mother Nature’s gift of senses to these rodents in developing non- toxic & non- hazardous formulation!
RodrepelTM is a low-toxic, non-hazardous rodent aversive. RodrepelTM is a perfect blend of smart technology and green chemistry. This product acts through a series of highly developed intricate mechanism ensuring that the rodents are kept away from the application. The product is compliant with RoHS, RoHS 2, REACH and is FIFRA exempted. Our eco-friendly products do not kill the target species but only repel them.

The products are available in the form of a masterbatch which can be incorporated in pipes, films, cables etc. while manufacturing. This would result in the final cable or wire being rodent repellent. This would be an efficient way of deterring the rodents from chewing the cables and wires and thus negate the possibility of a short circuit. While the RodrepelTM liquid concentrate (diluted in paints) and RodrepelTM lacquer solution can be coated over the applications which need protection. Our products provide a safe and environmentally friendly solution to avoid rodents.
Contact us, for any problems with rodents!

www.ctechcorporation.com

www.termirepel.com

www.combirepel.com

www.rodrepel.com

Rodent Infestation leading to shut down of Restaurants!!!

Why do we visit RESTAURANTS?

Restaurants are visited for trying out different variety of food and having a bit of relaxation time.

The quality of the food offered is all that matters when one visit a restaurant, isn’t it?

Restaurants are rated on the scale of quality as well as hygienic of food maintained. The best the service provided by the restaurants the best it is rated. The primary factors of the differentiation of restaurants are the food offered, the cuisine or the style of offering. Beyond this they may differentiate themselves on factors like speed, formality, location, cost, service or novelty themes.

A restaurant is inspected by FDA twice in a year and examined on the basis of hygiene, safety and cleanliness. The inspection often takes an hour to complete. Inspectors look for anything that could present a health concern to the public. If any of the violations are noted then the restaurants are banned until the violation reason is completely eradicated.

Following are the evidences of some of the restaurants being closed.

Gulshan Indian restaurant shut because of rodent infestation

23 September, 2017, Dave Parkinson, Tivy side Advertiser.

AN Indian restaurant in Cardigan has been closed following a rodent infestation.

The Gulshan Restaurant, Chancery Lane, was issued with a hygiene emergency prohibition order on Monday by Aberystwyth magistrates after an application by Ceredigion County Council environmental health department.

The restaurant will remain closed until health officials are satisfied the problem has been sorted out.

The prohibition order, posted in the window of the restaurant, states there is an ‘inherent risk to food safety’.

Restaurant Report Card: Roaches, slime, rodents found in local eateries

By Bill Spencer – Investigative Reporter, September 21, 2017 and Click 2 Houstan news

HOUSTON – Rodents — they’re not the kind of guests you ever want to see at a restaurant, not only for what they are, but for what they leave behind.

We’re talking about rodent droppings.

And rodent droppings are what Houston health inspectors found at Cici’s Pizza at 11803 Wilcrest Drive.

Inspectors discovered rodent waste on the floor behind the ice machine and behind a storage rack.

And speaking of roaches, inspectors found them at Bullrito’s near the University of Houston, on Calhoun.

The eatery was written up after inspectors found live and dead roaches in the kitchen.

Dirty Dining restaurant with 110 violations in 2016 ordered shut again

By Jeff Weinsier – Investigative Reporter, September 18, 2017, Local 10 abc news

MIAMI – In 2016 it was called China Buffet and earned the title of “RESTAURANT WITH THE MOST VIOLATIONS” at 110!

An Inspector was recently at Royal Buffet based on a complaint and found 47 violations.A live rodent was found under a sushi table and rodent droppings were found throughout the restaurant.

You can go through the following links which provides you with the list of restaurants being shut down due to the rodent infestation found in them.

http://www.decadeonline.com/results.phtml?agency=occ&violsortfield=TB_CORE_INSPECTION_VIOL.ENTERED_BY&violsortorder=DESC&forceresults=0&forcefac=0&offset=0&businessstreet=&city=&zip=&facilityid=&soundslike=&sort=PROGRAM

http://www.ocregister.com/2017/09/22/orange-county-restaurants-shut-down-by-health-inspectors-sept-16-22/

https://www.local10.com/news/dirty-dining/dirty-dining-restaurant-with-110-violations-in-2016-ordered-shut-again

All of a sudden a shut-down notice hampers your restaurants growth and also the reputation within a county gets lowered. This is all because of the tiny pests called as RODENTS.Rodents such as mice and rats are of more concern because they are the main culprits of shutting down the restaurants. Rats and mice are attracted to the restaurants due to availability of the food and warm habitat.

There are many access areas through which this pest enters the restaurants like sewage lines, air ducts, basin outlets, etc. Such areas cannot be totally kept apart from the surroundings and hence the infestation cannot be removed very easily.

You can easily find out the infestation in your restaurant by the signs of rodent infestations as rodent droppings all over the area, polymer based application bitten up, peculiar smell of rodent urine, etc. The rid of rodent infestation is important as the rodents are the carriers of many diseases and they can be easily transferred to people via food they eat in your restaurants.

For maintaining the hygiene and safety at your restaurant against the pesky restaurants we can help you by providing you with an ecofriendly solution which is RodrepelTM.

RodrepelTM is manufactured by CTech Corporation using green technology. The restaurants can be well protected by using our product RodrepelTM. It works on the mechanism like fear, discomfort, aversion, training and association & conditioning. As stated earlier the product is based on green technology product which does not kill the rodent but only repels thus maintaining the ecological balance of the earth.

Our product is available in three forms viz. Masterbatch, Liquid Concentrate and lacquer.

RodrepelTM Masterbatch can be incorporated in the polymer based applications while processing them. The polymer applications like wires, cables, pipes, polymer made kitchen equipment, etc. can be manufactured by using our masterbatch.

RodrepelTM Liquid concentrate can be mixed in paints in proper proportion and cover the entire area of infestation by paints. RodrepelTM Lacquer form can be directly used as top coating over the application.

Our product solutions do not interfere with the properties of the application and in plus point provides a complete protection against the harmful pest like rats and mice.

For further information you can visit our website and contact us:

www.ctechcorporation.com

www.combirepel.com

www.rodrepel.com

www.termirepel.com

Martens:Your co-passenger

Who are Martens?   Do they harm us!!

Let’s find the answer to these questions below.

Martens are slender, agile animals, adapted to living in taigas, and are found in coniferous and northern deciduous forests across the Northern Hemisphere. They have bushy tails, and large paws with partially retractable claws.

An average pine marten measures between 45 and 58cm (17 to 22in) with the tail adding between 16 and 28cm (6.3 and 11cm) to their length. Due to a large geographical range, they can vary greatly in size. Males are often 10-30% larger than females. They weigh between 0.9 and 2kg (2-4.5lbs) on average.

Pine martens live for up to 18 years in captivity but more often live for 8-10 years in the wild.

This species is an omnivore. The majority of their diet consists of small mammals and birds which are supplemented with fruits, insects, carrion, eggs, and fungi. Berries become a large part of their diet throughout autumn. Martens are attracted to the smell of polymer.

Martens invade engine bays because they are drawn in by the warmth and safety of the enclosed engine bay or by the smell of urine and feces from other martens. Once inside, they bite into hoses and wires to make space for them or just for fun. They also urinate and leave bite marks in plastic and rubber as a way to mark their territory.

Martens love to chew on rubber and plastic. The most common victims of Martens’ ridiculously sharp teeth are spark plug wires, coolant hoses, wiper fluid hoses, rubber CV axle boots, rubber steering rack bellows, wiring insulation and under hood sound deadening material.

A hole in a coolant hose can cause a car to overheat, crack a cylinder head, blow a head gasket, or even seize all potentially catastrophic for a car and driving with a chewed-up ignition wire can lead to a misfiring engine, meaning unburned fuel will enter the exhaust stream and lead to destruction of catalytic converters, and those things aren’t cheap to replace.

These methods to protect cars against these critters i.e. by using wire mesh under the engine bay or by using ultrasonic sound (which tends to be damped by the various parts in the engine bay) Martens get used to these and they find ways to get past closures.

Let us have a look at the below news articles.

Stone martens are coming for your car.

16 July 2009

This article was published in the local.

The stone marten may look like a cute wild mammal, but the German Hunter’s Association (DJV) warned on Thursday that the predator’s breeding habits is damaging more cars than ever. The furry martens – akin to ferrets and weasels – damaged 180,000 cars in 2007 – an increase of one-third from the previous year.

The nocturnal omnivores, also known as beech martens, live near developed areas and tend to mark vehicles with their scent during mating season.

In 2007, stone martens cost car owners an estimated €40 million in damages by chewing through cables and wires in engines.

The DJV recommended frequent car washes to remove the animals’ scent, especially if they have caused damage to the car in the past.

Some automakers also offer a preventative system that delivers small electric shocks near the car engine if martens try to get too close.

 Help, martens have invaded my car!

15th  September 2017

This Article was published in wort.lu

I’ve noticed these long, thin, ferret-like creatures roaming the streets in my village at night. What I didn’t realize was that they have been looking for a bed for the night, and that bed has been under the bonnet of our car.

I noticed the screen wash had run out, and when I got home, I dutifully refilled it. Then I tried it out. Nothing happened.

I lifted the bonnet and discovered that the rubber connecting tube had been cut. It must have been vandalsAfter further inspection, I uncovered a piece of chewed rubber, about the size of a small mouth, lying on the engine. Aha, I deduced – so something has bitten it! At last came the small moment of wonder when you learn something you thought you never would. My ‘vandal’ had actually been a marten, which apparently loves to nibble at any rubber tubing or wires that get in the way of a good night’s sleep.

What’s more, these little sharp-toothed cuties can do much worse than bite through your screen washer. They’ve been known to nibble on spark-plug wires and coolant hoses and crunch through brake hoses and ignition wiring. Electric hybrid cars, with all those additional wires, are the most susceptible to costly damage.

Earlier this year, the Wort reported that three baby martens were found in an engine compartment in Niederanven.

It appears there is little we can do about these critters. Ultrasonic devices and things that give martens an electric shock only work to a limited extent. They are also a protected species, for those of you who have more menacing ideas.

There were also similar incidents reported in different parts of counties.

There needs to be an alternate solution for this as martens are a worldwide phenomenon. They cause of path of destruction wherever they go and it needs to be stopped effectively and immediately keeping the ecology in mind.

C Tech Corporation has come up with such a unique and ideal alternative: Rodrepel™

Rodrepel™ is a non-toxic, non-hazardous and environmentally safe anti-rodent additive for masterbatches specially developed for a range of polymeric and coating applications. It is also effective in case the target species is birds and other animals. This product works on the mechanism of repellency. It does not kill the target species, and also does not affect the application it is used in. It is available in masterbatches, liquid concentrate or lacquer form.

This product does not leach out of the end application and is thus Non-hazardous.

It does not affect the humans coming in contact with the application they are incorporated in. Thus being Nontoxic.

And moreover, last but not the least, it does not kill the animal but only repels them. Thus it is ECO-FRIENDLY.

Incredible Incisors

Have you recently found shavings of wood, clothes going torn, cables losing their insulation or holes in your walls at home?

There is a chance of your home being invaded!

Yes, invaded by the pesky creatures, called rodents!

How is it even possible for such tiny creatures to do this?

But they do this. They make use of their incisors to make these menaces happen.

What makes the rodent’s teeth so strong?

The intricately crossed crystals of a mineral called calcium hydroxyapatite embedded in collagen make their teeth strong. The composite microstructure is so strong that it has served as a model for a so-called “bio-mimetic material,” a synthetic copy created in the laboratory with ceramics and polymers.

Incisors are the front-most teeth in mammals. These incisors have thick layers of enamel on the front and little enamel on the back. Dental enamel is the hardest substance of any mammal’s body, but rodent enamel is the toughest of the tough. Because they do not stop growing, the animal must continue to wear them down so that they do not reach and pierce the skull. As the incisors grind against each other, the softer dentine on the rear of the teeth wears away, leaving the sharp enamel edge shaped like the blade of a chisel.

Most species have up to 22 teeth with no canines or anterior premolars. In rats, these are the four, long, sharp front teeth, two on top and two on the bottom. Rat incisors are highly specialized for gnawing. They are open-rooted, which means they grow throughout life. Rodents also have one or multiple pairs of premolars or molars (these teeth, also called cheek teeth, are located towards the back of the animal’s upper and lower jaws). Molars are the rearmost teeth in the mouth, used for grinding food prior to swallowing it. Molars are never replaced. Rats have only one set of teeth during their life. Rats particularly have 12 molars, six on the top and six on the bottom and three on each side of each jaw.

Rodents eat a variety of different foods including leaves, fruit, seeds, and small invertebrates. The cellulose rodents eat is processed in a structure called the caecum. The caecum is a pouch in the digestive tract that houses bacteria that are capable of breaking down tough plant material into digestible form.

Rodents gnaw with their incisors by pushing the lower jaw forward and chew with the molars by pulling the lower jaw backward. In conjunction with these chewing patterns, rodents have large and complex jaw musculature, with modifications to the skull and jaws to accommodate it.

Their teeth are so razor sharp that they can gnaw through the hardest of substances including lead pipes, cinder blocks, solid wood doors, a four-inch-thick slab of concrete, even a half-inch thick sheet of iron. Rats have gnawed through iron cabinets to access food. Insulation is not safe from mice either. They will tunnel into insulation inside walls and attics, either to make a home or to gather soft materials for their nests. By chewing through electrical wires, rats have caused many house fires. Rats and other rodents are believed to be the cause of 25-40% of all house fires through chewing wiring and creating nests of flammable materials like paper, cloth, and other bedding in confined areas.

Rodents will chew through the food packing to get to the food. They may chew through boxes and bags which you may think are safe.

The mice have no respect for any item. They will gnaw on and into just about any chewable item that is stored in the attic, basement, garage or closet – including irreplaceable family heirlooms, valuable paintings, and important documents. Mice also can dig up and feed on newly planted crops in gardens, cause damage before harvest, and burrow into other areas on the property for food and nesting.

An adult rat’s jaws are 20 times more powerful than a person’s, biting down with a force of 24,000 psi, about the same as a crocodile’s jaws. The bite of rat can easily cut through bone. Rats can and will attack people if they sense that they are defenseless such as the elderly, disabled, and infants.

Gnawing is one of the key tell-tail signs of the presence of rats. Gnawing may be visible on doors, ledges, in corners, in wall material, on stored materials, or other surfaces wherever rats are present. Fresh accumulations of wood shavings, insulation, and other gnawed material indicate active infestations.

Let’s have a look on the below news articles where rodents have left the evidence of their menace.

Rat complaints in San Francisco have surged over the past five years

September 25, 2017 – SFGATE

A rat race of sorts is happening in San Francisco, where rodent complaints have surged in the past five years.
Since 2012, San Franciscans have steadily reported more rat sightings to 311, San Francisco’s official site for information and complaints. This year, the agency received around 848 calls from January through August and, if the numbers continue at the same rate, it’s projected that there will be about 1,272 calls made by the end of 2017.

Rodents cause north Abilene house fire

September 14, 2017 – Big Country

Rodents started a fire that caused $5,000 worth of damage to a north Abilene home Thursday morning.

A press release from the Abilene Fire Department states the fire began after rodents chewed through wiring in the attic of a home on the 1800 block of Grape Street just after 9:30 a.m.

Smoke was seen coming from the eaves of the home when firefighters arrived on the scene, but crews were able to contain the flames to the attic and quickly got the fire under control.

Investigators were able to determine the rodent-chewed wiring caused an electrical malfunction, which started the fire, according to the press release.

A typical home may have more than a dozen potential entry points for the rodents. They get through gaps as small as 15mm, often using plumbing pipes and unscreened vents or gaps in the eaves and roof edges. Homeowners in Lincolnshire are being urged to guard against a fresh invasion of rats this autumn. Dee Ward-Thompson, BPCA technical manager, says residents should be doing all they can now to protect their properties. She said: “Rain washes rats out of sewers and other nesting places and, inevitably, they go looking for shelter in higher ground. “They’ll try to find some sort of dwelling and that could be lofts, garages or sheds. “Our members report the number of calls to deal with infestations often rises in the Autumn when the temperature drops often quite dramatically and we’re expecting a similar pattern this time. “So it’s important for homeowners to do as much as they can to ensure they’re not among those affected.” Bridgend County Borough Council was named top of the list for rats in 2015/16 with almost 3,000 call-outs per 1,000 residents making up 93 percent of its total number overall.

Rodrepel™, an anti-rodent additive, a C Tech Corporation product is an ideal solution for the prevention and control of rodents. Rodrepel™ is available in the form of solid masterbatches, liquid concentrate and in lacquer form. Rodrepel™ available in lacquer form can be applied directly on the surface of the applications. The liquid concentrate mixed with paints can be used as a topical application. The products can effectively control the proliferation of these undesired pests!

Rodrepel™ is RoHS, RoHS2 and REACH compliant and FIFRA exempted. The mechanism followed by our product is repellence by attacking their olfactory senses of the rodents. Also, our products do not kill the target species. The products do not interfere with the working of the end application it is used in. They are stable at high temperatures; they do not leach out or produce any toxic fumes and have a long shelf life.

Have a safe environment!

 

 

Nutria: An Invasive rodent!

The nutria (Myocastor coypus), a large, semi-aquatic rodent native to South America, originally was brought to the United States for its fur. Nutria are approximately 2-feet long, with a large head, short legs and a stout body that appears hump-backed on land. Nutria are excellent swimmers, and valves in their nostrils and mouths seal out water when submerged to swim or feed.

Nutria damage is evident to varying degrees in every area they are found. Burrowing causes the most noticeable damage. Nutria burrows also can damage flood-control levees that protect

low-lying areas; weaken the foundations of reservoir dams, buildings, and roadbeds; and erode the banks of streams, lakes, and ditches. Nutria also causes a huge damage to agriculture sector. Crop damage is most prevalent in areas adjacent to aquatic habitats supporting nutria and especially when nutria are abundant. Crops primarily damaged by nutria are sugarcane and rice, but also include corn, milo (grain sorghum), sugar and table beets, alfalfa, wheat, barley, oats, peanuts, and various melons and vegetables.

Nutria can be infected with several pathogens and parasites that can be transmitted to humans, livestock, and pets. They may also host a number of parasites, including the nematodes and blood flukes that cause “Nutria itch” or “Swimmer’s itch” (Strongyloides myopotami and Schistosoma mansoni), the protozoan responsible for giardiasis (Giardia lamblia), tapeworms (Taenia spp.), and common liver flukes (Fasciola hepatica). The threat of disease may be an important consideration in some situations, such as when livestock drink from water contaminated by nutria feces and urine.

Let us have a look at some evidences where rodent involvement proved to be catastrophic:

Louisiana Recruiting for Fight Against Nutria, Aka Coypu

Aug. 14, 2017, US News

Louisiana is recruiting coastal landowners, hunters and trappers for a program to fight the nutria — an invasive rodent that eats so much aquatic vegetation that it threatens swamps and marshes.

The state estimates that nutria denuded nearly 6,000 acres of fragile marshland this year in spite of a bounty program to control the fast-breeding animals.

A lot of private property isn’t registered, and the owners are missing a chance to protect their property and the coast, biologist Catherine Normand said Friday.

They were eating an estimated 80,000 to 100,000 acres (32,400 to 40,500 hectares) of marsh plants a year before the program began. Damage for the past five years is estimated at 4,600 to 6,500 acres (1,900 to 2,600 hectares) a year.

The estimated value of sugarcane and rice damaged by nutria each year has ranged from several thousand dollars to over a million dollars. If losses of other resources are added to this amount, the estimated average loss would probably exceed $1 million annually.

Concern over spread of rat-like coypu after Cork sightings

May 15, 2017, The Irish Times

Members of the public have been urged to report sightings of rat-like creatures, known as coypus, which the Service fear could cause extensive damage to river banks and other habitats.

The coypu is native to South America but has spread throughout North America and into Europe and has now arrived in Ireland with numerous sightings of the animal

Mr O’Keeffe (NPWS conservation ranger) said there have reportedly been sightings of coypus around the Curraheen River, on the River Lee, at the Atlantic Pond down the Marina, in Douglas, Mallow and Cobh as well as in Tipperary, Offaly and Dublin.

Mr O’Keeffe said that so far the NPWS has eradicated 11 animals mainly around the Curraheen River but the coypu which travels mainly by water ways has the potential to spread across the countryside as happened in East Anglia which necessitated a major eradication programme.

The conventional methods used to get rid of the pests include Zinc phosphide baits, traps etc. However these solutions are temporary and do not provide an effective solution against the pest nuisance. The use of conventional fumigants, rodenticides is no longer considered to be an effective solution to get rid of the rodent infestation as these rodents are becoming increasingly resistant to them. Also fumigation is a tedious, time consuming and an expensive method and is highly toxic. Exposure to such chemicals for a long time can cause damage to lungs, nervous system and even paralysis in severe cases. Therefore, we are in an urgent need of an infallible plan to combat the problem of increasing number of rodents. These rodents economically important furbearers when their pelts provide income to commercial trappers. Moreover these rodents are economically important furbearers when their pelts provide income to commercial trappers. Thus we need to look for is an answer which would help to solve the problem of coypu, while at the same time not harming the nutria anyway.

We have a Solution for you!!

CTech Corporation can offer a solution to this problem. Our product Rodrepel™ is a non-toxic, non-hazardous rodent aversive. This product acts through a series of highly developed intricate mechanisms ensuring that rodents are kept away from the target application. This innovative product is in masterbatch form, can be incorporated with the drip tapes, tubes, pipes, agricultural films, mulches. The product does not leach out, thus preventing soil pollution. Groundwater reserves are also not polluted. Also, the non-target beneficial species like earthworms, bees etc are not affected.

Our product in lacquer form can be coated over tree guards, fences, various PVC surfaces etc. which would ensure complete protection against these creatures. Our products provide a safe and environmentally friendly solution to avoid rodent infestation in agriculture.

Contact us if you’re facing problems against insects,animals or both

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Encountering Gopher Nuisance??


Do you encounter any tunnel system (ref. below fig.) of some 18 inches below ground and some fresh mounds all over your landscape?

Then these are definitely done by a rodent called as GOPHER, commonly referred as Pocket Gopher.Let’s get introduced to this tiny critter creating a great havoc in the backyards.

Gophers fall under order Rodentia commonly known for their extensive tunneling activities. The 35 species of gophers live in a habitat such as woodlands, grass prairies, coastal to mountainous regions. They spend their days building complex underground tunnels in the areas having soft soil and abundance of food availability.

Gophers are attracted to moist, light-textured soil with edible vegetation. Their main runways are located up to 18 inches below the surface, though their nesting chambers are much deeper, often six feet below the surface.

Gophers are the notorious hoarders. They carry their food in cheek pouches and stockpile astounding amount of food in the huge underground settlements, hence the name pocket gophers.

Gophers are the omnivorous species and feed on nuts, berries, grass, leaves and insects. Gophers are small creatures of 5 to 12 inches. They have their front feet long, sharp claws useful for burrowing. Their hairy tails are four inches long useful to navigate through tunnels when moving backwards.

They create fan-shaped mounds that are large enough to damage irrigation systems, dams, fields and of course homeowners’ lawns and gardens.

The image shows how big mounds are created by these tiny gophers.

Following are the evidences explaining the damage.

Gophers slowing construction in Thurston County

Posted 12:36 pm, April 26, 2017, by Q13 news staff

The Mazama pocket gopher is listed as threatened in Thurston County, and that is putting construction on hold, regardless of what property owners may want.

“They have more rights to our property than we do,” Deborah Mclain told Q13.

“In one instance, I had to give up 64% of my property where we built the house,” homebuilder Larry Weaver said. It was a little over an acre of ground, and 64% had to be fenced off as gopher habitat.”

‘Pest’ pocket gophers to be killed off

By Daniel J. Chacón, The New Mexican, Jan 10, 2017

The city of Santa Fe is going on a killing spree.

Hundreds, possibly thousands, of pocket gophers are the target.

The little critters — rodents, really — have infested two parks in the south-central part of the city, dotting them with dirt mounds and, according to city officials, compromising irrigation lines, ruining the turf and making the areas unsafe for sports and other recreational activities.

“Go to Franklin Miles, and you can see that it looks like thousands of little landmines have exploded, and that’s throughout the entire park,” Trujillo said Tuesday. “These pocket gophers dig.”

“Pocket gophers are not protected by any state or federal law or local ordinance,” said Victor Lucero, manager of the city’s integrated pest management program. “They’re not considered endangered. They are a rodent pest.”

One pocket gopher has the potential to create 60 mounds in the course of one month,” he said.

Pocket gophers – No. 1 enemy in subsurface drip irrigation in western alfalfa

Cary Blake | Dec 31, 2015

The continued farming skirmish pits western alfalfa growers – who want to upgrade from traditional surface irrigation systems to more water efficient subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) systems – against vertebrate pests, mainly pocket gophers, which chew up underground SDI drip tape.

While the stakes are high and producers have an upper hand, gophers remain the No. 1 enemy.

“Rodents are undoubtedly the major challenge for SDI in alfalfa in northern California,” said Dan Putnam, University of California Extension alfalfa and forage specialist based at Davis.

Are you now aware of the Gophers nuisance? Then let think for the solution and which is provided by CTech Corporation’s product RODREPELTM

The evidence shows the havoc created by gophers and it so great that people tried to kill them by using insecticides. Killing the animal is not an economically and environmentally feasible solution.

CTech Corporation provides you with an eco-friendly solution against gophers. Our product RodrepelTM is extremely low toxic, non-hazardous, non-mutagenic anti-rodent, anti-animal aversive. It can be effectively used against gophers and other similar damage causing rodents like voles, moles, rats, etc.

RodrepelTM  is the product manufactured on the basis of green technology. Our product is RoHS, RoHS2, ISO complaint and FIFRA exempted which proves are low toxicity and environment safety concerns.

RodrepelTM  is available in the forms masterbatch, liquid concentrate and lacquer.

RodrepelTM Masterbatch is incorporated while processing in polymer based products such as drip irrigation pipes, electric supply cables, etc.

RodrepelTM Liquid concentrate is to be mixed in paints in proper proportion and RodrepelTM  lacquer is a direct top coat application which can be applied on fences, installed products, walls, etc.

Contact us on for pest repellents against Rodents/Insects/Animals/Birds by using our following websites:

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